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Safe Search Engines for Kids

Following Safer Internet Day last week, we h ave compiled a list of 'safe' search engines for children to use as an alternative to Google and other similar sites.

 

 

Quintura for Kids

Quintura for Kids is powered by Yahoo. It gives a more visual way of searching using a keyword cloud. You start off your search with a keyword in the text box and then modify it with any of the keywords in the cloud. Quintura displays five results per page. You may miss it, but clicking on the surrounding icons takes you to the five preset search categories ““ Music, History, Animals, Sports and recreation, and Games.

 

 

KidRex

KidRex is a custom Google search engine for kids. The interface is just like a child’s crayon drawing (the dinosaur stands guard). It uses SafeSearch and tries to keep all the results as antiseptic as possible.

KidRex also has its own database of inappropriate websites and keywords which further help to keep the results clean.

 

 

Ask Kids

Ask Kids is a search engine for kids from Ask.com’s pool of web resources. The search page resembles a school note book. Apart from the search box, five preset search categories –Schoolhouse, Movies, Games, Videos and Images, help out the kiddies research all kinds of stuff.

Kids can jump from the search results to images, narrow or expand the search, find related names and other information. It borrows the features from Ask.com and its regular search, but keeps it simple for kids.

 

 

KidsClick

KidsClick makes it clear in its About page that it is not an internet filter. It is a directory of good resources (a 600+ strong subject list) which kids can use for information or schoolwork. KidsClick is owned and run by the School of Library and Information Science (SLIS) at Kent State University. As the web resource links to a comprehensive collection of good, clean sites, the KidsClick interface is without any ads.

 

 

Yahoo Kids

Yahoo Kids is the doorway to Yahoo’s directory of websites and URLs exclusively for kids. The homepage is colorful, engaging, and full of cool stuff to keep your child engaged. So much so, that it’s quite easy to miss out the search box at the top corner. Search results are collated under three sections – Results in Yahoo! Kids, Results in the Yahoo! Kids Directory, and Results on the Web.

 

 

Study Search

Study Search is a customized Google search engine (with Google SafeSearch) for Australian schools. That shouldn’t stop the rest of the world using it. The search taps into the database of relevant sites created for primary and secondary Australian schools. The database of worldwide links has been built up by Australian teachers, librarians and site volunteers.

 

 

SquirrelNet

SquirrelNet is a kids only search engine that has Google SafeSearch activated. From the homepage itself, you can also access the Google directory of websites relevant for children.

 

 

Aga-Kids

Aga-Kids is a visual search engine for kids and one of the more colorful ones you will see. You can choose between a visual search and a text search. The search results come up as interactive and animated thumbnails.

The search results may be limited because the search engine searches only websites that are made for children.

 

 

Dib Dab Doo and Dilly Too

If any name shouts out that it’s a search engine for kids, then this is it. The search engine is again based on Google Custom Search and it tries to keep the content as children friendly as possible.

Custom search helps to keep out a lot of unsavory links, but it is definitely not foolproof. Most of the search engines for kids also display ads with some undesirable ones sneaking in. Parental control software in combination with these search engines can help to keep children shielded from the bad side of the web. It is a tough battle but parents can worry a little less. These ten search engines for kids are just the search tools for some unattended browsing around an unsafe web.

 

Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons

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